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ABOUT SPEAKERS
Keynote

André Picard
Health issues have occupied top headlines in Canadian media, and no journalist has written on public health with more authority or for as many years as André Picard. Picard’s most compelling columns cover a broad range of topics including Canada's right-to-die law, the true risks of the Zika virus, the financial challenges of a publicly funded health system, appalling health conditions in First Nations communities, the legalization of marijuana, the social and economic impacts of mental illness, and the healthcare challenges facing transgender people. Most recently, he made a heartfelt plea to stop dehumanizing elders, to reimagine long-term care and to fix a broken system. Sadly, it took a coronavirus pandemic to open our eyes to the deplorable state in long-term care homes.The topic of health touches on the heart of society, intersecting with many aspects of private and public life—human rights, aging, political debate, economics and death.With his talks as in his reporting, Picard clearly conveys the connection between physical health and the health of society as a whole, provides the facts to help Canadians make knowledgeable health choices, and acts as a devoted advocate for those whose circumstances bar them from receiving the care they need.

Plenary

Panel Discussion – Charting a Path Forward for Long-term Care


André Picard
Health issues have occupied top headlines in Canadian media, and no journalist has written on public health with more authority or for as many years as André Picard. Picard’s most compelling columns cover a broad range of topics including Canada's right-to-die law, the true risks of the Zika virus, the financial challenges of a publicly funded health system, appalling health conditions in First Nations communities, the legalization of marijuana, the social and economic impacts of mental illness, and the healthcare challenges facing transgender people. Most recently, he made a heartfelt plea to stop dehumanizing elders, to reimagine long-term care and to fix a broken system. Sadly, it took a coronavirus pandemic to open our eyes to the deplorable state in long-term care homes.The topic of health touches on the heart of society, intersecting with many aspects of private and public life—human rights, aging, political debate, economics and death.With his talks as in his reporting, Picard clearly conveys the connection between physical health and the health of society as a whole, provides the facts to help Canadians make knowledgeable health choices, and acts as a devoted advocate for those whose circumstances bar them from receiving the care they need.



Marie-Andrée Bruneau

Dre Marie-Andrée Bruneau obtained a graduated degree in psychiatry in 2001, and a master’s degree in biomedical sciences from University of Montreal. Certified as a geriatric psychiatrist by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in 2013, Dr. Bruneau is also full professor at the Psychiatry Department of University of Montreal and was the Executive Director of the Geriatric Psychiatry division from 2011 to 2020. Researcher at the CRIUGM, Dr. Bruneau is also involved with the Health Ministry of Quebec for the Alzheimer plan (BPSD).

Pat Armstrong

Pat Armstrong is Distinguished Research Professor in Sociology at York University and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Focusing on women, work and the health and social services, she has published such books on health care as Wash, Wear and Care. Clothes and Laundry in Long-term Care: Troubling Care; Critical to Care: The Invisible Women in Health Services; Wasting Away; The Undermining of Canadian Health Care and The Privatization of Care: The Case of Nursiing Homes. as well as many book chapters, journal articles and reports intended for public audiences.


Penny MacCourt

Penny MacCourt MSW, PhD is a researcher with a focus on seniors, mental health, social isolation, caregivers, service delivery and policy. She has worked with seniors in LTC, acute care and community as a social worker and mental health consultant. She is chair of Action for Reform of Residential Care BC, an advocacy group. She is lead author of the CCSMH research report Supporting Mental Health and Well-Being in Residential Care Settings During COVID-19 and Beyond that will contribute to national standard for LTC.


Indigenous Health and Older Adults with Dementia


Jennifer Walker

Jennifer Walker is a Haudenosaunee member of Six Nations of the Grand River with a Ph.D. in Community Health Services (Epidemiology) from the University of Calgary. She is an Associate Professor at McMaster University in the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, & Impact. Dr. Walker’s work focuses largely on Indigenous community-engaged health research using large health services databases through her work as a Core Scientist and Indigenous Health Lead at ICES in Ontario and through the Health Data Research Network Canada.

Dr. Walker has an active research community-engaged research program in aging and dementia. She is the co-lead of the Canadian Consortium on Neurodegeneration and Aging’s (CCNA) Team 18 – Issues in Dementia Care for Indigenous Populations and the lead for the Indigenous Cognitive Health Program. She has also led the validation of the Canadian Indigenous Cognitive Assessment tool and the implementation of the tool in Anishinabek communities of Northern Ontario.


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